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Running gMT and vgtmpeg 64bit on Windows

goDromo Media Transcoder has always had the ability to run on 64bit on Windows from day one. You can learn more about how to configure browsers for 64bit operation on window in this support page.

However the lack of 64bit browsers has been a challenge to go 64bit. Things are getting better though, and with today’s release of Chrome on 64bit for Windows, albeit only on the dev channel for the moment, you can now use 64bit on Windows. 64bit Chrome OS X is still missing though. Hopefully it will come online soon.

There are many benefits about running goDromo Media Transcoder on 64bit, the main one being performance. In our tests 64bit gMT is about 15-20% faster than the 32bit counterpart. You can check the support page to know more about 64bit mode but you can always check the task manager on Windows 8 to see if gMT/vgtmpeg is running in 64 bit mode.

vgtmpeg_64

vgtmpeg screaming through a transcode at 64bit speeds on Windows 8.1

Happy 64bit Transcoding!!

What is vgtmpeg?

vgtmpeg is a ffmpeg/avconv clone that adds a number of additional features to the stock ffmpeg and libavformat/libavcodec libraries augmenting its functionality. One of the most important ones being support for Bluray and DVD input support.

Try online

You don’t have to download vgtmpeg to use it. You can try and use vgtmpeg from your web browser using goDromo Media Transcoder, a native cloud app that uses vgtmpeg as its backend. Try some ready-to-use gMT profiles right here.

Using

Although gMT is the easiest way to use vgtmpeg, if you are comfortable with using programs through the command line you can just download vgtmpeg separately. vgtmpeg is a superset of ffmpeg/avconv, therefore if you are used to them you’ll feel at home because the full command line API available with ffmpeg is also available with vgtmpeg. You can also use the standalone vgtmpeg version to be integrated with other projects.

Supported formats

vgtmpeg comes precompiled with a big variety of mux formats and audio and video codecs. For an exhaustive list of what formats are supported visit the gMT format page

vgtmpeg vs ffmpeg

We love ffmpeg for its versatility and wealth of contributor support. vgtmpeg doesn’t try to be a substitute to ffmpeg. Rather, we try to have vgtmpeg to be a superset ffmpeg distribution with added features. Hopefully some of the features that vgtmpeg introduces will make into the master ffmpeg repository.

Download

We offer precompiled binaries of vgtmpeg for an assortment of different platforms. We have spent extra care building the following binaries to make sure that all assembly optimizations and multi-threaded processing are enabled where available. 64bit versions are usually faster than 32bit builds, so we recommend you use those if you are running a 64 bit system.

Changelog

1.4.63
- fixes a bug that would end the transcode quickly if not using server mode (i.e. using command line)

1.4.62
- fixed report duration from DVD parsing. some DVDs were reporting wrong length
- libdvdread messages are now only seen when set logging to verbose
- fix important issue with some DVDs where a whole cell would be skipped
- DVD urls are not reported with / slashes
- speed improvements when opening DVDs with lots of titles (30+)
- libvpx bumped up to 1.0.0
- bluray now much richer with chapters, language on audio tracks

1.4.02
- Synchronized with ffmpeg/libavformat 0.10. All new filters and formats are supported
- Updated libvpx to version 1.0. This seems to be the initial release of libvpx supporting faster encoding for vp8.

1.3.22
- Added experimental bluray support. Bluray support can be used through the bluray url protocol. bd://

1.2.11
- Added xvid 1.3.2 encoder as a supported format. Xvid is supported in multithread mode in all platforms and architectures.
- Fixed character encoding issue between DVD audio languages and ffmpeg metadata. Now when converting to mp4 or other output muxes supporting language metadata, the language metadata is fully preserved from the DVD source.

1.2.10
- Fixed bug that was reporting incorrent duration of streams and DVD titles

1.2.9
- Initial public release with DVD support

DVD/Bluray support

vgtmpeg adds support for DVDs and BD in its version of libavformat. DVD/BD support is implemented by adding a new ‘dvdurl’ protocol that can parse DVD folders, DVD ISO files, DVD devices and more. The ‘bdurl’ protocol can parse bluray folders. All the regular features available in vgtmpeg/ffmpeg are still available when a dvd url or a bd url is used. From direct stream copy to all sorts of filtering and transcoding possibilities.

Using DVDs with vgtmpeg

Strictly one can open a DVD folder, ISO file.. by using a DVD url like this:

> vgtmpeg -i dvd://path_to_dvd  outfile

When using the above format vgtmpeg will inspect the ‘path_to_dvd’ location looking for a DVD image in the form of a ISO file, or a DVD folder. ‘path_to_dvd’ can also be any of the individual files inside the VIDEO_TS folder, ‘vgtmpeg’ will figure out the rest.

By default, the title with the longest duration is opened when using the above syntax. If you want to rely on this behavior, the use of the dvd:// is not required and just specifying the path will suffice. One can however, ask for specific titles to be used as the input using a url query var:

> vgtmpeg -i dvd://path_to_dvd?title=5 outfile

This will open the title 5 (if available) of the DVD. If you want to know what is available on a DVD simply type:

> vgtmpeg -i dvd://path_to_dvd

Using Bluray folders with vgtmpeg

Strictly one can open a Bluray folder,by using a BD url like this:

> vgtmpeg -i bd://path_to_bd  outfile

When using the above format vgtmpeg will inspect the ‘path_to_bd’ location looking for a Bluray folder image. The folder will be inspected for a bluray like structure and analyzed looking for titles and video and audio streams.

By default, the title with the longest duration is opened when using the above syntax. If you want to rely on this behavior, the use of the bd:// is not required and just specifying the path will suffice. One can however, ask for specific titles to be used as the input using a url query var:

> vgtmpeg -i bd://path_to_bd?title=5 outfile

This will open the title 5 (if available) of the BD. If you want to know what is available on a BD simply type:

> vgtmpeg -i bd://path_to_bd

DVD and Bluray paths

The path to use for the -i option is flexible. You can point to an IFO file, a VIDEO_TS folder, the root of a VIDEO_TS folder or an ISO file containing a VIDEO_TS folder. In any of the cases, vgtmpeg will try to figure out the root file of the DVD from this information and if successful will open the DVD and load the information in the IFO files.

At the moment only Bluray folders are supported and you should point to the root of the Bluray folder.

DVD/BD titles and vgtmpeg

The way vgtmpeg handles DVD/BD titles is by mapping every DVD/BD title as if it were a separate input file. You can image it as configuring the command line with an input switch ‘-i’  for every tittle available on the DVD/BD image.  All DVD/BD tittles are opened simultaneously and available for reading and conversion. This makes it possible for you to use all the features available on vgtmpeg/ffmpeg like stream mapping and the like. For example, you could conceivably  mix streams from different titles using vgtmpeg’s stream mapping.

 

Obtaining source

You can browse vgtmpeg sources on GitHub and Google Code

Filing bugs

If you find issues with vgtmpeg please go ahead a file a bug in our GitHub issue tracker.